February 12, 2019

Location: Ocean Shores
Observers: Dan Varland and Bill Clark.

Photos by Dan Varland

 

 

Raptor Count

Bald Eagle
16 adults, 4 immatures

 

Marked Individuals Observed

Species Color Marker Code
Bald Eagle B/O

 

 

Feeding opportunity at a Humpback whale carcass. The carcass washed ashore 

in mid-September. 

 

 

February 11, 2019

Location: Long Beach
Observers: Dan Varland, Bill Clark, Rich Van Buskirk, Tony Starlight

 

Photos by Tony Starlight and Dan Varland. Tony's show his name in the lower 

left corner. All others are Dan's!

 

Raptor Count

                Bald Eagle Merlin
 25 adults, 8 immatures 1 adult

 

 

Marked Individuals Observed

Species Color Marker Code
Peregrine Falcon R/7

 

 

Marked Individuals Observed

Species Color Marker Code
Bald Eagle B/O

 

 

Two-year old Bald Eagle.  

Freshwater creek. Just before the photo was taken, we saw this eagle take a 

drink. Creeks also provide bathing opportunities. 

Feeding on a partially buried marine mammal, this eagle will likely soon head 

to a nearby creek or pond in the dunes to clean up. 

Snowy Plover. 

With wind speed in the 15-20 miles per hour range, we saw this peregrine 

huddled on the leeward side of an abandoned Christmas tree. 

We baited the bird closer and saw that it was R/7, a first year female we 

banded at Long Beach during a survey on January 14.

 

Great job with the pics, Tony!

R/7.

Our baiting attracted a two-year old Bald Eagle. R/7 put on quite an aerial 

display in an attempt to drive him off. After a few exciting flybys, the 

eagle perched nearby in the dunes. 

 

February 7, 2019

Location: Ocean Shores
Observers: Dan Varland, Sergio Seipke, Albert Watters and Denny Hieronymus.

Photos by Dan Varland.

 

 

Raptor Count

Bald Eagle
13 adults, 12 immatures 

Marked Individuals Observed

Species Color Marker Code
Bald Eagle B/O

 

Sunrise and the Quinault Resort and Casino north of Ocean Shores.  Albert 

Watters photo. 


Joining us on today's survey was Sergio Siepke from Eldorado, Misiones, 

Argentina. Sergio owns Raptours, a tour company offering guided tours primarily 

focused on hawk and owl watching. Sergio is in the Seattle area north to 

Bellingham giving lectures and promoting Raptours. I went on a Raptours tour

last November while I was in South Africa for the Raptor Research Foundation 

annual conference. We spent most of our time in Kruger National Park. It was 

a fantastic experience! Behind Sergio and me is one of 25 Bald Eagles we 

saw on today's survey.  Albert Watters photo. 

 

Albert Watters photo. 

Albert Watters photo. 

First-year Bald Eagle. Albert Watters photo.   

Liftoff.  Albert Watters photo. 

B/O, a Bald Eagle captured and banded by Coastal Raptors on June 12, 2015. 

Dan Varland photo. 

With 86 re-sightings, B/O is by far the most re-observed eagle among the 35

banded by Coastal Raptors over the years. 

In raptors, females are larger than males. Here we have a first-year female 

perched in the foreground with an adult male beyond.  Albert Watters photo. 

Four-year old Bald Eagle. Without another eagle of unequal size nearby, it's 

difficult to determine whether this bird is male or female. Albert Watters photo. 

 

 

January 20, 2019

Location: Ocean Shores
Observers: Dan Varland, Dan Miller, Tom Rowley, Albert Watters, Dave Murnen and Lisa Dick. 

Photos by Dan Varland.

Raptor Count

Bald Eagle
9 adults, 4 immatures, 1 age uncertain

Fishing for surf perch. 

We talked with him. He said he was walking rather than riding because his front 

tire was low.

Bald Eagles feeding on a Humpback Whale carcass. We first saw this carcass

during a survey on September 14. While we saw many gulls on the carcass 

during surveys later in the fall and early winter, it wasn't until January 5 that 

we saw our first eagle feeding there. Today when we first approached 

the carcass we saw eight eagles: three feeding and five others watching a short 

distance away. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Setting up a mid-January picnic on the beach!

 

January 15, 2019

Location: Long Beach
Observers: Dan Varland, Scott Horton, Natasha Peters and Rylee Twinam. 

Photos by Dan Varland.

 

Raptor Count

Bald Eagle Peregrine Falcon Northern Harrier
14 adults,
3 immatures
1 immature 2 age uncertain

 

Individuals Marked

Species Color Marker Code
Peregrine Falcon R/7

 

Spindrift. Dictionary.com defines spindrift as  "spray swept by a violent wind 

across the surface of the sea." We measured the wind speed from the beach at

several points and the highest reading was 14 miles per hour. 

 

 

 

One of the 17 Bald Eagle we saw on today's survey.

 

Beach walkers. 

 

First-year female Peregrine Falcon we captured, banded and

blood sampled. 

 

Natasha Peters with R/7. 

Rylee Twinam, Natasha Peters and Scott Horton with R/7 just before release. 

Common Ravens. The male, larger of the two and holding something in his

beak, is on the right. A closer look revealed it was a piece of metal, probably 

tinfoil. We thought he was trying to impress his mate with it. 

 

 

Along another section of the coast we found ravens feeding on a Stellar's

Sea Lion carcass. 

 

 

...and a man and his dog enjoying the day. 

 

January 5, 2019


Location: Ocean Shores

Observers: Dan Varland, Dave Murnen, Tom Rowley and Cecelia Boulais.

 

Raptor Count  

Bald Eagle Merlin
4 adults, 5 immatures 1 age uncertain

 

Adult Bald Eagle. Dan Varland photo. 

Humpback whale carcass we saw during a survey on September 14, 2018.  Dan 

Varland photo. 

The same Humpback Whale carcass on today's survey of January 5, 2019 with 

lots of gulls feeding.  Dan Varland photo. 

 

 

One-year-old Bald Eagle feeding on the carcass on today's survey. This photo

and the other close-ups of the eagle feeding were taken by Tom Rowley. 

 


South end of the study area, and today's turnaround point. The tide was rising,

so we decided not to risk driving further south. Dan Varland photo. 

First-year Bald Eagle standing on the very last remains of a carcass. Dan 

Varland photo. 

 

At one point we saw two Bald Eagles by the carcass, the larger being a female. 

In Bald Eagles as with most raptors, females are larger. Unless two birds of

opposite sex are side-by-side for comparison, it's difficult to ascertain their 

genders. Dan Varland photo.

 

December 30, 2018
Location: Ocean Shores
Observers: Dave Murnen, Virginia Molenaar, Lisa Dick and Dianna Moore.

 

 

Raptor Count 

Bald Eagle Peregrine Falcon
6 adults, 8 immatures 1 immature

 

 

 

Marked Individuals Observed

Species Color Marker Code
Bald Eagle B/O
Peregrine Falcon 35/B

 

 

Bald Eagle pair.  Virginia Molenaar photo. 

Most Bald Eagles reach adult plumage with white head and tail at five years

of age. This one, with a dark stripe along the side of the head, is age four if 

he (or she!) is on the most common molt cycle.  Virginia Molenaar photo. 

 

December 7, 2018
Location: Ocean Shores
Observers: Dan Varland, Sandra Miller, Bill Morgan and Denny Hieronymus.

Photos by Dan Varland. 

 

Raptor Count 

Bald Eagle Peregrine Falcon
2 adults, 2 immatures,
1 age uncertain
1 immature