Date: August 25, 2017
Location: Ocean Shores
Observers: Dan Varland and Dave Murnen; John, Andrea, Zoe and Miles Mann. 

Comments: Photos by Dan Varland and Dave Murnen. 

 

Raptor Count 

Bald Eagle Osprey
1 immature 1 age uncertain

 

Dave Murnen shares images with Zoe and Miles. 

 

I talk about raptor banding with Miles, Zoe and their dad 

John.

 

Miles and Zoe recorded data on people and vehicles along the survey route, 

with a little help from their friends. 

 

Common Raven scavenges a gull. 

 

Very large Stellar's Sea lion carcass not far from Conner Creek at the north end

of the study area. We notified Marine Mammal Standing Network biologist 

Dyanna Lamborne about the standing.

 

This young man found a sculpin in a salt water pool left by

the receding tide. 

 

 

Heermann's Gulls.

 

It was a good day to be on the beach, despite the low raptor count!  

 


 

Date: August 17, 2017
Location: Long Beach
Observers: Dan Varland; Victor, Joan and Monte Estrada; Glenn Marquardt, Diane 

Fuller and Karla Antrim. 

 

Raptor Count

Bald Eagle Turkey Vulture Osprey
2 adults, 2 age uncertain 4 adults 1 age uncertain

 

Marked Individuals Observed

Species Color Marker Code
Common Raven RSYLOG

 




Our very special guests on today's survey, the Estrada family  from Barcelona, 

Spain. Posing for a photo with me are Montse and Victor with their son Joan. 

Diane Fuller photo. 




Victor and Joan. Victor works in business and is a peregrine researcher. Joan is a
high school student with one more year to go; he plans to go to college and study
in the biological sciences.   Joan is especially interested in shorebirds. 
Montse Estrada photo. 

 

An excellent photographer, Victor shares some of his images with Joan and
Diane Fuller. Victor's photos from the survey are featured below.
Dan Varland photo. 

 

Osprey with fish. Victor Estrada photo. 

 

Turkey Vulture.  Victor Estrada photo. 




Victor Estrada photo.  


Color-banded Common Raven. Coastal Raptors captured, banded and tissue-
sampled this individual, a female, on June 7, 2013; she was trapped about
three miles north of where we saw her today. Our sighting was the fourth,
one in 2016 and three in 2017. All of the sightings have occurred within
a few miles of the banding location. Victor Estrada photo.

 

Banded Caspian Tern. I reported our sighting to the federal Bird Banding Lab.  

Victor Estrada photo. 

 

Long-billed Dowitchers.  Victor Estrada photo. 



Long-billed Dowitchers. Victor Estrada photo.  


Snowy Plover.  Victor Estrada photo. 



Sanderlings.  Victor Estrada photo. 



Sanderlings.  Victor Estrada photo.  



Enjoying the coast, south end of the Long Beach Peninsula. Dan Varland photo.



Date: June 15-16, 2017

Location: 3.5 miles west of Hoquiam, WA

Participants: Dan Varland, Luke Sutton, Andetrius Lee, Jennifer and Dorianne 

Seel, Glenn Marquardt.





We set out to capture, blood sample and wing-tag 

Turkey Vultures and possibly Bald Eagles at the 

location indicated by the arrow. The effort included 

pre-baiting with deer and dogfish shark carcasses 

and setting up a blind in the trees to the right of the 

arrow. 

 


The blind. 




Luke Sutton in the blind. 




I set out a motion-activated camera in the days leading up to our trapping 

effort. Here a Turkey Vulture walks in front the camera. 




Three wing-tagged Turkey Vultures turned up to feed during pre-baiting, before 

the trap was set. Here we see BV, a vulture we captured and tagged a few miles 

from the trapping location at the Hoquiam Wastewater Treatment Plant on July 

11, 2015. Two Black-tailed Deer  watch the vulture feed.  




In addition to vultures, both tagged and un-tagged, 
this 3-year-old Bald Eagle 

turned up to feed before we started our trapping effort. 

 


Three vultures soaking up the sun in a Sitka Spruce about 100 yards from 

the trap site. That's AY in the upper right, a vulture we tagged June 13, 2013

on the beach 7 miles north of Ocean Shores. Dan Varland photo. 




Turkey Vulture AY in flight. While we made a valiant effort to catch birds

for the avian scavenger study, it was to no avail. June 14 was a rainy day. There 

was little activity at the set. On June 15 the immature eagle flew in and began 

feeding. I was in the blind and elected to hold off firing the net launcher until 

Luke Sutton and Andetrius Lee could arrive to help with the bird under the net.  

Before they could arrive, the eagle flew off, never to return. An hour or so later 

two vultures landed, then walked to within 5 feet of the set. Unfortunately they 

quit walking and flew off in a hurry at the sound of the front door closing at 

the house next to the trapping station. After that Jennifer and Dorianne Seel watched 

for vultures and the eagle from the blind for several hours. While several circled

over the set, none would land. We think they were on to us, so no captures!   

Dan Varland photo. 




Date: June 14, 2017
Location: Ocean Shores. 
Observers: Dan Varland, Luke Sutton, and Dianna Moore. 

 Raptor Count

 

Bald Eagle Peregrine Falcon
11 adults, 7 immatures 1 immature

 

Luke Sutton. Luke monitors Peregrine Falcon nesting in southwest 

England. He and colleagues band peregrine nestlings and are interested

in expanding their research effort to include banding adults. Luke is a 

student at the University of Plymouth. Visiting Washington at semester's 

end, Luke spent one week with the Bud Anderson's Falcon Research Group 

and most of another with Coastal Raptors. It was great having Luke join us! 

Dan Varland photo. 

 

Nestling Peregrine Falcon banded by Luke Sutton and colleagues in southwest 

England this spring. Bird banding is called ringing in Europe. Its origins

date back to 1899 when Denmark's Hans Christian Cornelius Mortensen 

applied metal bands to European Starlings.  Luke Sutton photo. 

Remains of a scavenged bird carcass.  Dan Varland photo. 



Luke photographs tracks near the carcass using his phone.  Dan Varland photo. 




Bald Eagle tracks near the carcass.  Dan Varland photo. 




Common Raven tracks near the carcass. Dan Varland photo. 




Bald Eagles at a sea lion carcass.  Luke Sutton photo. 




Luke Sutton photo.  


Peregrine Falcon. Luke Sutton photo. 



Date: June 12, 2017
Location: Long Beach
Observers: Dan Varland, Luke Sutton, Glenn Markquardt, and Charlotte Killien. 

 

 

The night before our survey, we stayed at the George Johnson House, a B&B 

on the Long Beach Peninsula at Ocean Park. Our gracious, most excellent

hostess was Charlotte Killien.  Dan Varland photo. 

 

Charlotte and Luke. We found time to drive the beach the evening before 

the full survey on June 13. The George Johnson House has been part of 

Charlotte's family since the 1970's. Dan Varland photo. 

 

Scrub Jay across the street from the George Johnson House in Ocean Park.  

Luke Sutton photo. 

 


Date: June 13, 2017
Location: Long Beach
Observers: Dan Varland, Luke Sutton, Glenn Markquardt, and Dorianne Seel.

 

Raptor Count

Bald Eagle Turkey Vulture Osprey
9 adults, 9 immatures 1 adult 1 age uncertain

 

 

 

Marked Individuals Observed

 

Species Color Marker Code
Common Raven RSYLOG

 

Luke left the vehicle for a better photo of a Bald Eagle, which was perched 

atop a post. Dan Varland photo. 

 

Caspian Tern with bands. We saw and photographed six banded Caspian Terns  

during the survey; the band combination for this individual and the others have 

been submitted to the Bird Banding Lab. Luke Sutton photo. 

 

Dorianne Seel photographed this immature gull feeding on an Elephant Seal 

carcass. Field guides we consulted lead us to think this might be an Iceland Gull,

but when this photo and the one below were sent to gull expert Ryan Merrill, he

wrote "definately not an Iceland or Thayer's Gull since it's much too bulky and 

big-billed". Ryan concluded our gull was a Glaucous-winged or Glaucous-

winged-Western Gull Hybrid. 

 

Dorianne Seel photo. 

 

Three-year-old Bald Eagle feeds on a sturgeon head. Luke Sutton photo. 

 


Date: June 2, 2017
Location: Grayland
Observers: Dan Varland; Ryan, Candice, Rob and Helen Flook



Raptor Count

Bald Eagle Turkey Vultures
6 adults, 5immatures 4 adults

 


Turkey Vulture drying wings. Dan Varland photo. 




Another wing-drying vulture.  Dan Varland photo. 




Nature's cleanup crew, Turkey Vultures walking in to feed on a sea lion carcass.

Dan Varland photo.  


Immature Bald Eagle feeds on a seal carcass with another immature and a crow
watching closely!  Dan Varland photo.